Corey Mock

Month: July 2015

Honoring Glassheim’s achievements, street named after legislator, former council member

Grand Forks Herald

Eliott Glassheim waves to cars as they pass by his street as he jokingly says he will turn the street into a toll road in Grand Forks on Thursday, July 30, 2015. (Grand Forks Herald/ Joshua Komer)
Eliott Glassheim waves to cars as they pass by his street as he jokingly says he will turn the street into a toll road in Grand Forks on Thursday, July 30, 2015. (Grand Forks Herald/ Joshua Komer)

A staple of Grand Forks has gotten his way—a street, that is.

Colleagues, friends and family came together Thursday afternoon to honor longtime legislator and former Grand Forks City Council member Eliot Glassheim. Though the signs have been up for two to three weeks, a small group held an informal ceremony celebrating the stretch of Third Street between Kennedy Bridge and Point Bridge, known honorarily as Eliot Glassheim Way.

Despite suffering a health scare in April, Glassheim, 77, laughed and joked with nearly every person in attendance. Visibly in good spirits, he described seeing the “Glassheim Way” signs across from his Grand Forks home of 40 years as “overwhelming.”

“I thought they were kidding when they told me,” he added, prompting laughter in his kitchen.

Glassheim has lived on that very street for more than 40 years. He retired from the City Council in 2012 after 30 years of service.

Glassheim started as a state senator in 1993, according to the North Dakota Legislature website. He also served in the state House of Representatives in 1975.

He was also “instrumental” in rebuilding downtown after the 1997 flood, said state Rep. Corey Mock, D-Grand Forks. Glassheim is the author of several books, and edited others on the flood and natural disasters.

Friends, Family, and fellow legislators gather around Eliott Glassheim in Grand Forks on Thursday, July 30, 2015.

Friends, Family, and fellow legislators gather around Eliott Glassheim in Grand Forks on Thursday, July 30, 2015.

One guest, Nick Jensen, said he started meeting with others to brainstorm ways to honor and thank Glassheim last February.Jensen first met Glassheim when he was 15 when the then-City Council member happened to speak to his Boy Scout troop.

The two have maintained a good relationship and still keep in touch.

When Jensen started asking various community members about their thoughts on the honorary street, he encountered only positivity and encouragement.

“It was all Eliot and all the years and years of service he had,” he said.

He added that getting support from different political sides was especially remarkable.

Mock came across the same reactions—everyone he told the idea to “loved it.” He has worked alongside Glassheim for years in the Legislature. He also owns Glassheim’s old book store, Dr. Eliot’s Twice Sold Tales.

“We’ve been really good friends with Eliot for many years,” Mock said of Glassheim and his wife, who designed the store’s new logo to include its previous owner.

Mock said he’s always looked up to Glassheim and his work ethic.

“You show them that respect while you can,” he said.

The Glassheim Way signs represent several meanings, Mock said.

It serves as a reminder for those who see the signs to “go the Glassheim way,” or the hardworking, worthwhile way, Mock said.